Danish design


Arne Jacosben

“economy plus function equals style” 

Arne Jacobsen, (born Feb. 11, 1902, Copenhagen—died March 24, 1971, Copenhagen), Danish architect and designer of many important buildings in an austere modern style; he is known internationally for his industrial design, particularly for his three-legged stacking chair (1952) and his “egg” chair (1959), the back and seat of which were formed of cloth-covered plastic.The urban myth that the photograph of Christine Keeler astride an Arne Jacobsen chair was taken when she was a model is false in more senses than one.

First, the chair used in the photo turns out to be a copy of the original. The hand-hold aperture cut out of the back was a ploy to avoid the legalities of copyright. Secondly the photograph was taken, not on a modelling session, but at the height of the revelations regarding the exposure, of the going-ons, of the War Minister and a young female, caught up in an affair which became known as 'The Scandal' or 'The Profumo Affair'.

 JØRGEN BO & VILHELM WOHLERT
 JØRGEN BO & VILHELM WOHLERT

Important Jacobsen works during the 1950s include a group of houses at Søholm (1950–55), the Jesperson Building (1955) in Copenhagen, Rødovre Town Hall (1954–56), and the SAS Building (1959), Copenhagen’s first skyscraper, for which he did the interior design as well as the architecture. Time does not stand still; neither do the wrong kind of interior designers. 50 years on and the Radisson SAS  Royal Hotel has unfortunately been completely redecorated. Only room 606 has been carefully preserved and remains identical to Jacobsen’s  original commission. Jacobsen received his diploma in 1928 from the Copenhagen Academy of Arts. His first buildings date from 1930, but his first major work was the Bellavista Housing Estate (1933) at Klampenborg, near Copenhagen, where each house offers a view of the sea.

A major work of Danish modernist architecture is also considered the Louisiana museum of Modern Art. In the well-balanced style of the late 1950s’discreet modernism, the museum presents itslef as a horizontal and understated building complex that fits gracefully and intimately into the landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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